Patient Perception of Physician Attire Before and After Disclosure of the Risks of Microbial Contamination

  • Enoch C. T. So Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine, The University of Hong Kong.
  • Faraday H. F. Fung Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine, The University of Hong Kong.
  • Joshua K. H. Yeung Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine, The University of Hong Kong.
  • Lilian H. Y. Chow Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine, The University of Hong Kong.
  • Julio S. H. Kwok Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine, The University of Hong Kong.
  • Ruby L. Y. Lam Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine, The University of Hong Kong.
  • Tommy C. Y. So Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine, The University of Hong Kong.
  • Faye S. M. Yu Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine, The University of Hong Kong.
  • Dana Vackova School of Public Health, Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine, The University of Hong Kong.
  • Gilberto K. K. Leung Centre of Education and Training, Department of Surgery, Queen Mary Hospital, Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine, The University of Hong Kong.
Keywords: Clothing, Cross Infection, Patient Preference, Patient Safety

Abstract

Background: The white coat is traditionally considered to be the appropriate attire for physicians but it may also be contaminated with microbes and act as a potential source of infection. We aimed to study patients’ acceptance of physicians’ attire, their underlying reasons, and their reactions to an educational intervention with regards to the risks of contamination. Methods: We conducted a voluntary ques­tionnaire survey at a university teaching hospital in Hong Kong from February to July 2012. 262 patient-responses from adult inpatients and outpatients across various specialties were analysed. Results: White coats were highly favoured (90.8%) when compared with scrubs (22.1%), smart casual (7.6%) and formal (7.3%) wears. ’Professional image’ and ‘ease of identification’ were the main attributes of the white coat. Most patients (92.2%) would prefer doctors washing their white coats every few days, whilst 80.9% believed that doctors were actually doing so. After patients were informed of the potential risk of microbial contamination, white coats remained as the most favoured attire (66.4%), but with scrubs doubling in popularity (45.8%). Smart casual (9.2%) and formal attire (4.6%) remain the least accepted. Conclusion: Despite cross-infections being a significant concern within the healthcare environments, patients’ predominant acceptance and perceived attributes towards the white coat were maintained after an educational intervention on the risks of microbial contamination.

Author Biography

Enoch C. T. So, Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine, The University of Hong Kong.

Enoch So is a final year medical student of a 5-year pro­gram at the University of Hong Kong. He holds a Bachelor degree in Bioin­formatics (Hons 1) and is a University Medalist in Bioinformatics at the Uni­versity of New South Wales, Australia.

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Published
2013-12-31
How to Cite
So, E. C. T., Fung, F. H. F., Yeung, J. K. H., Chow, L. H. Y., Kwok, J. S. H., Lam, R. L. Y., So, T. C. Y., Yu, F. S. M., Vackova, D., & Leung, G. K. K. (2013). Patient Perception of Physician Attire Before and After Disclosure of the Risks of Microbial Contamination. International Journal of Medical Students, 1(3), 109-114. https://doi.org/10.5195/ijms.2013.216
Section
Original Article